SitRep

For a host of reasons I’d rather not go into here, it’s not been a great week. But I’ve been chipping away at the lists and the projects and I’m determined through shear perseverance to make things better. SO THERE.

The state of things (short version):

  • My Jeans Shop shoes are nearly done. Commando soles have gone on with just some tiny detail work to finish and I’ll be able to (finally!) wear them again. They’re a great fall shoe, so the timing even works.
  • “New” bike saddle hasn’t exploded in flames yet. So that’s great.
  • I’ve made a teeny bit of progress on my new custom sneakers- but that’s ever-so-slightly back burnered until I clear one or two other things off the docket first.
  • Speaking of other projects: I’ve been working on the design for a series of patches. Good old-fashion embroidered patches with iron-on backing. I’ve got two mostly done, and another two in design progress. Be forewarned, though: these will be shortish runs. You’ll find them (eventually) here.
  • Slow, slow, slow progress on the new shoulder bag. Stumbled upon a lovely way to do the bottom of the bag, and I’ve been collecting reference pictures of bags to help work out some of the other details about size & construction. Still trying to get away from so much of the “tactical” look but retain functionality and durability.

SitRep

Another one!

  • Bike seat is done. It came out pretty well, I think- though, to my eyes not perfect. That’s ok, as I’m just going to park my butt on this thing and pedal, so perfect was only ever going to be a temporary condition anyway. I ended up using some vinyl to cover it (instead of leather), as it was cheaper, readily available, and would bother me less if I screwed up. I figure if I’m wildly dissatisfied I can always rip everything off and start over. [edit: held up on the first ride!]
  • My dad and I have been working on a IoT project for my garage doors- it’ll give me the ability to monitor their state remotely. I’ve got most of the hardware installed, and now it’s on to debugging.
  • Three shoe projects in the works, now.
    • One: me finally getting around to finishing a resoling project on a pair of Jeans Shop shoes I’ve had for ages. I’ve decided to convert them to treaded soles while I’m at it too, for a bit more all-season traction. I need to grab another 8-10 1″ Spring Clamps (and remove the rubber from them) to finish this.
    • Two: My customization of a pair of sneakers is slowly moving forward. It’s looking more and more like I won’t be able to get a pair of the shoes I’ve coveted for so long, so it’s time to start looking at DIY options. Side note: did you know you can totally just buy big sheets of cork in specified thicknesses? Super useful.
    • Three: A pair of Tim’s-Not-Tom’s shoes for my wife are starting to come together, too. I’ve got materials for the uppers, lining, footbed, and midsole. Still looking at options for the outsole, though- I’ve not been overly pleased with what I’ve found for this previously. Tom’s combines the midsole and outsole in their shoes- it appears to be EVA foam with rubber strands baked in, and I’ve not found a source for that directly. Wouldn’t mind a bit more traction for these, too.
  • Shoulder bag v4 is still on my brain. I’m trying to design it to retain the features and functionality I want, but with a less “tactical” look to the thing. Less black Cordura and webbing; more earth tones and subtlety. That means some of the fabric I had earmarked won’t work anymore, so back to sourcing that.
  • Starting another long-term project for my bike. I’ll be a hand built part of the drivetrain, and I’ve already got the slab of brass I’ll need to build it. I’m going to need to actually get my vise mounted again to do this one, though. And some soft jaws for it. And my wits about me, as it were. And maybe upgrade some of my files.

SitRep

Projects abound.

  • Working on the newsletter [HSP #83] to go out soon, I hope. It’s been so busy for the last few weeks that having time to find content has been tough- hopefully I’ll be out of most of that soon.
  • Bicycle SeatMy favorite bicycle saddle is pretty hard to find in it’s original incarnation. I’m luck to have one on my road bike, but I’ve been itching for another for a mountain bike for a while now- and I’ve sort-of had it. My second saddle was in a sorry state- all the leather and padding for the front half had worn off, and it was pretty much unusable in that state. So I decided to take a swing a re-working it. Currently, the padding is (I think) pretty much done- now it’s time to source leather and figure out how to best mount that.
  • SuppliesThere’s a pair of shoes I’ve had my eye on for a long time. They were super rare and wildly expensive- and I was unwilling to spend the sort of money required. Now, though, there’s a new version being released. More robust, less expensive, and lovely in every way. But: there’s a decent chance I won’t be able to get my hands on a pair- or that the price will still be too much to stomach. So: a new shoe project for me, then. Still working on some details (and how far down this rabbit hole I want to go), but progress none the less.
  • Hand Made KeyboardHoly smokes, remember that keyboard project from a year ago I was working on? Yeah, that. Progress! I have firmware up and running on it- still lots to sort out, but it’s kind of working now. Still plenty to do, but it’s closer to being done than ever before. Everything is tiny and hard to solder, and the firmware (while easier than I feared) is still a byzantine and borderline occult process. Regardless: I’ll be able to say I built this keyboard by hand from scratch. So that’s something, I suppose.
  • There’s been some (but, if I’m honest, not tons) of progress on the new shoulder bag project. I’m pretty sure I have the hardware I need- and even much/most of the fabric. But there’s some research to be done and an order to put in for the rest, and I just haven’t had a lot of time to devote to it recently.

SitRep

Oh how time flies in the summer.

  • Went on vacation- and I took much of that time off the internet as well. Got outside more, ate (too much) food, and played with happy kids in a pool.
  • Updated the bio every-so-slightly here. A little less focus on the past, maybe a little more focus on the future.
  • A new shoe project (slowly) making progress- I’ll share more as things come along, but right now I’m still in the “amassing supplies and logistics” phase of these things. Indeed, I haven’t entirely settled on the model of shoe I’ll be modifying for this, though a Vans Classic Slip-On is high on the list.
  • The long-dormant new-shoulder-bag project is back! I’ve had some inspiration (finally!) about what I want to be different about this new bag (as compared to the existing & failing shoulder bag I currently use). I even have many/most of the materials in stock- I’ll need a couple small things, but that’s it.
  • Just ordered most of the supplies to overhaul my best shock fork for my mountain bike. It’s long overdue, so it’ll be good to have it feeling plush and buttery soon. Of course I’ve never overhauled one of these before, so there’s that. And a bunch of the parts I need are on backorder, so I’m waiting as well. After, I’m looking at maybe a drivetrain modification. We’ll see.

SitRep

Time, once again, for an update.

  • I’ve seen a big (for me!) bump in newsletter subscriptions. That’s awesome! I have no idea where these folks have all come from (or who sent them my way)! Puts a bit of pressure on me to get the next edition out, anyway…
  • Tom Sachs has a new NikeCraft website up (with a new movie!) that’s pretty neat. I’d add it to my “Required Viewing” playlist, but it’s not hosted on YouTube, so…
  • On that note, I’ve been building a bunch of boxes/crates to better organize things. Finally built a box for 7″ records I’ve needed for a few years(!), a box to organize my index cards, and the start of a new art-supply cart for the studio. I’ll have spots for tools and markers and whatnot, but it’s capped by some paper storage and a smallish bookshelf, letting me keep reference books close to where I’m working. Need to build a wheeled stand for the whole thing, now.
  • I’ve beed riding bikes more (again), and I’m starting to get some of my groove back. I still have “off” rides from time to time, but some confidence and practice is paying off. Maybe (just, maybe) some fitness is coming along. Also, finally have the bike running properly- though my fork needs an overhaul (and I’m loath to send it out for maintenance, but I’ve never overhauled one like this, and I’d similarly loath to have any bike downtime, so…)
  • Starting to think about and plan a new pegboard setup in the garage- right now I’ve got too much 2nd tier stuff in 1st tier placements. I’ve got a single 4′ x 8′ board right now, but I’m looking at making that a true 8′ x 8′.
  • I still need to build the 2nd small parts rack (and the accessories that go with it). I finally located space in the studio/office for it to live, so I suppose it’s time to fire up the saw…

SitRep

Once again.

  • So the Shelf Project v2 is finally done. Plenty of work, but worth the effort, I think. Those chairs aren’t for sitting, btw- that’s why there’s (deliberately) no headroom above them. Sentimental, those…

Shelves v2

  • Small Parts Storage Unit 1 is completed. It’s loaded with some of my parts cases, but I’ll be building a second just like this very soon- that will have removable inserts for holding plano boxes of very small parts, as well as some shelf units to hold 2nd tier tools (like my sewing machine and typewriter).

IMG_3361

  • HSP #1 Hardcopy is out in the wild. This is a shot of the master copy. Download is here.

IMG_3368

Still do do:

  • 2 record boxes for holding 7″ records (or, as you might call them, 45’s)
  • Aforementioned second parts box rack
  • A flat file for holding large pieces of art. Sometimes called a “map file.”
  • Starting to look at better monitor options for the home office.
  • Starting to shoot more video again- my new Glif came in (finally!), and so I can put my lovely phone to better use.
  • A new desk surface on my desk. It’s currently metal, but I’d like a nice slab of wood (with some features to better suit my “standard” setup). Currently thinking about double-thick 3/4″ plywood, but that may change.
  • New custom shock mounts for my car’s rear shock absorbers. This simply requires some available downtime.
  • Started working on HSP #2 hardcopy. Currently amassing material.

SitRep

New Stuff:

  • Vol 1 of the HSP (Happy Shiny People) zine is live over here. It’s an honest-to-god, made-from-paper labor of love. I used pens and scissors and glue to make an old-school zine from the good ‘ol days. Same bizarro content as the newsletter but in a much stranger wrapper. Download a copy, print it out, fold and staple, and send me a picture of one of these in the wild. Then go make your own. It’s fun.
  • Shelf Project #2 has started- half the hardware is on the wall (the rest needs some modifications first), and the shelves are cut, assembled, and sanded. Finish next, then assembly. I’m really looking forward to these being done- besides addressing a storage problem, the shelves themselves function a bit as an art install of their own- sort of a meta-project, and one of those times when (properly done) the whole can surpass the sum of it’s parts.
  • In reference to Shelf Project #2, that means a careful examination of the current book storage and periodical archive. The new shelving is for a particular class of books and artifacts, and I still need to go through the deep storage and suss out and items from there that belong in the new install. I’ve got a small batch pulled currently, but I know there’s a bunch more buried in there.
  • Small Parts Storage Project v3. I’ve moved to a new(ish) sorting box setup, and this will be some shelving/racks for them. They’re based on the modular shelving Tom Sachs uses a lot in some of his installs, and they’ll live out-of-the-way in the basement studio area. Casters on the bottom (I think…), and they should also provide storage for some 2nd-line tools (things like the sewing machine, typewriter, soldering iron, usw). I formerly (and still somewhat) used a selection of Plano sorting boxes, but as some of my small parts are don’t work well in those, I’ve had to branch out. Still working on an insert for the new shelving to also handle legacy storage boxes.
  • Working on an ancient keyboard for the home rig. It’s a Dell QuietKey RT7D5JTW, and it’s got a pretty decent feel to it- much better than the old Apple keyboard I’ve been banging around on. Problem, though: it has a PS/2 connector (instead of USB), so I found an active PS/2 to USB adaptor, and that’s working great. Next problem: some of the keys are ugly and bothersome legends on them. Easy fix: paint them. Right now keys are slowly being sanded and painted (one by one, god help me) black, but I’m adding silver sharpie to some of the edges, and it starts to look like the keys were made of metal, painted black, and now the worn paint is showing metal through it. Eventually I’ll have to paint the case, too. Third problem: the command key is in the wrong place. It should be right next to the spacebar, but for whatever reason it’s one over from that. Drives me nuts. So, tonight I’m going to make a custom keyboard map and rework all that.

SitRep

Here’s where I stand (currently, anyway…):

  • Despite it looking like the weather was on the verge of changing (into spring), that’s not happened. So all the wood-based projects have to continue to wait a bit longer. Which is fine, in reality, because I’ve not yet finished designing them.
  • A bunch of new framing projects just fell into my lap- the re-discovery of some art by my wife means some large frames (30×44″ for the work itself, with the frames being somewhat larger than that…) need to get dealt with. Also mats. And glass.
  • I’ve been working on a new “Required” list- a compendium of readings, movies, music, and items that I feel are/should be required in my world. Inspired by Tom Sach’s latest notebooks and the references in the back. Take a look at his here. I do keep a relatively-up-to-date “Required Viewing” YouTube playlist here, if you want to work your way through that.
  • Working on a new project for myself, and I’m hesitant to give to many details yet. It’s one of those where I’m not sure anything will ever come of it, or if it’s just a step to the next thing. Regardless, I’m getting all organized with notes and lists and folders and whatnot. It feels good to get the juices flowing, sometimes, regardless of what might (or might not) come of it. Building things is good, you know? Even when those things are just knowledge structures.
  • Starting to read up on the rigging of zip lines. Kids want one, but I’ve only ever rigged them with rope, and this would be a wire-rope situation, so there’s plenty of differences. Learning is fun. Have I mentioned that?

Personalized Video Learning

Dan Meyer just put out a nice blog post pushing back against some promotion of “Personalized Learning.” You can find the article here:

http://blog.mrmeyer.com/2017/problems-with-personalized-learning/

He’s not wrong- the applications the original article talks about are basic and only interesting if you compare them to pretty terrible teaching techniques. I’m not here to pile on about it, because there’s no need and Dan nicely covers the bases. I’m here because his article triggered an idea, and I needed a place to work that out.

In his response, Dan brings up the oft-touted benefit of video lectures: that students can rewind and review parts of the lectures to “further” their understanding, or to “clarify” difficult concepts. He also (rightfully) points out that that’s not how this really works- you don’t ask someone to repeat exactly what they said again when you miss something the first time. You ask for the variation- the alternative take. Another angle on the whole thing, that might better clarify that difficult concept.

But what if we could?

I’m not sure of the specifics of implementing something like this, but it seems like it might work like this:

  1. An instructor does a short video about a difficult concept. For that video, we follow current best practices and keep the video sub-six minutes, we have good graphics, speedy and natural delivery, and all that goodness.
  2. The same instructor records several other takes- and that’s not variations on the first video, but alternate methods. Maybe a metaphor. A real-world example. An animated version. Whatever.
  3. The student is eventually served that first video, and at the end of viewing, is presented with something like a “Got it?” button. If yes, move on to the next thing. If no, student gets served one of the alternate videos on the subject. Repeat until the answer is yes.
  4. Over time, analytics show which video versions are most useful (as they’re likely the last version watched…), and we can start feeding that data back into the creation of video segments (so, for example, if the animated graphic version seems to do best, that becomes the primary video in the future).
  5. Indeed, most LMS systems would allow those video analytics to be collected per-student, and you could eventually begin to serve each student individually the version of the video most (statistically) likely to suit them. You’d want to keep that model somewhat fluid, as students will find different variations work best/better on different subjects.

I’ve not seen this done, but in retrospect it seems pretty obvious. If you’ve seen this work somewhere, could you send me a link? I’d like in on that action.

Continuums

Since I went to EdCamp Boston a bit ago, I’ve found myself thinking about the session Dan Callahan led about the Chaordic Path. It was a great session, and the Chaordic Path idea slipped nicely into my existing structure of understanding of learning spaces.

My issue (or, rather less judgmentally, my thought…) is more centered around the graphic commonly associated with that idea.

C6pnQJAW0AAETyq

There are a bunch of topics that I’ve spent time dealing with in classrooms over the years (mostly in regards to themes in literature) that students have struggled with, and many of those themes seem to have the same thing in common: they occupy a spectrum. Or, if you’d rather, a continuum. Things like “Good vs Evil” or “Light vs Dark” or “Male vs Female” come up over and over, and while student at first gravitate towards them, as the inherent complexity becomes more clear, they find themselves struggling with the ideas. What they want initially is a nice binary choice: things are either good or evil (but not both). It’s ok if a character switches from good to evil, but students want to treat that like a switch- one moment they’re good, the next and they’re evil.

But that’s not human reality- people (fictional or otherwise) are rarely wholly good or wholly evil. More often they’re complicated mixes of the two that vary both based on the time but also based on your perspective as an observer. And so: we find ourselves trying to explain continuums. They are, of course, familiar with a number line, but they are not used to applying that sort of model to other aspects of human life. Gender. Sexuality. Order and Chaos. Good and Evil. Light and Dark.

We want to represent the complexities of life as simply as we can- that’s part of the efficient transmission of information. But we must learn to be careful in classrooms to not adopt such simplified models that we loose the inherent meaning imparted by the continuum. Instead of allowing binary choices to abound, it’s time to start showing students that most of what they think of as binary simply isn’t, and to treat is as such is reductive. It is a cheat- to reduce something complex to an overly simple model allows flawed thinking and cognitive fallacy.

It’s ok for things to be complicated. It’s ok for there not to be easy answers to seemingly simple questions. And it’s ok for our answers to change based on when/where/how/who is doing the asking (and for the questioner’s perspective of our answers to shift, too).

Asking a student if a character is good or bad is a fine start, but by broaching the idea of there being a full spectrum of good vs bad (and that a given character’s position on that spectrum might not be a simple thing to answer) allows students safe ways to begin to understand that complexity.

Dan’s presentation of the Chaordic Path was very good (clearly, as I’m still thinking of it several days later…), but it’s the graphic I want to address. The interlocked rings are a good start (and, for the purposes of the session, likely the right choice). But I find myself thinking that a line- a simple line representing the spectrum of spaces between Camos and Stifling Order does a good job of illustrating both that these gradations exist, but also that an environment can easily slip between these areas over the course of a lesson or day. In my mind, it’s a spectrum with “sweet spots” on it where especially useful conditions seem to exist.